Hungering for an egalitarian marriage

“And I had this romantic notionof the life I could have with Hamid. My education had given me career prospects. We would both work, and we would both contribute to the household. We would be a team, real partners. I wanted a life where I could make the decisions along with my husband.” So says Fawzia Koofi in The Favored Daughter. “Also, because I came from a family where multimarriage was the norm, I knew I didn’t want it for myself.”

This Middle Eastern culture should have ended 1200 years ago, but it didn’t.  Today pastors are preaching wives submission, while this Afghan woman is hungering for an egalitarian marriage.

Tell your pastor to read “The Favored Daughter” and see exactly what it is that he is espousing.

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About bwebaptistwomenforequality

Shirley Taylor writes with humor and common sense, challenging the church body to reclaim equality for Christian women.
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5 Responses to Hungering for an egalitarian marriage

  1. I don’t think people realize how closely the treatment of women within the middle east is compared to how women were viewed in biblical times. Now, I’m not saying ENTIRELY…but some of the attitudes were very close.

    You see and feel how these women today are treated as property, etc within some areas of the world – as I’m sure is noted in the book you mentioned. Then you have Jesus coming to tell men to change their thinking, loving, and basically cultural view of women…among others. You hear of how radical it was, but yet you seriously have to wonder if they realize the extent of how RADICAL it was.

    Picture going to an Afghan man, and telling them to love others as they love themselves. Love your wife as you love yourself. Serve them, etc. I’m sure they may think you are a nut, or too radical, etc. Heck they may even stone you!

    Funny how most can empathize with this egalitarian longing in the present with this Afghan’s woman life, and yet it is a dirty word here in the states. What a total disconnect!

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    • Yes! That is something that is entirely missed in our churches. Today I heard of a church in this area where the pastor of a Baptist church wanted to discuss having women deacons, and two deacons (male, of course as they all are) said they would leave the church if the church agreed to that. The pastor caved. Of course.

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