Christ for Women

My April newsletter is called Christ for Women

The Forgotten Story of Easter

If our leaders in the Southern Baptist Convention are to be believed, women must be under the authority of men.  This means that women cannot be a deacon, and she can not be called to preach.

Easter tells us differently.

Early in the morning a group of women went to the graveside of their friend Jesus to anoint his body with oil.  What they received was Jesus’ anointing them to His service.

This was no small thing.  We find Jesus telling the woman at the well that he was the Messiah and we see her go out preaching to her neighbors, and we have heard him speaking to Mary and encouraging her to learn at his feet.

And now, on this holy morning, we find Jesus telling the women who he was, and giving them direction to tell others. “Go and tell the men where they can find me.”

The Gospel of Mark tells us that He first appeared to Mary Magdalene, and she went out spreading the good news. 

When they heard that he was alive, and had been seen by her, they refused to believe it.

Churches everywhere on Easter morning will tell the story of Jesus’ resurrection and of the women who went to his grave. 

Then they will leave the women at the graveside, because they refuse to believe that a woman can preach the good news.

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About bwebaptistwomenforequality

Shirley Taylor writes with humor and common sense, challenging the church body to reclaim equality for Christian women.
This entry was posted in Equality for women in Southern Baptist churches and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to Christ for Women

  1. TL says:

    Interestingly it is legalists that do this. But if they were true legalists they would only choose women to evangelize about the resurrection of Jesus because Jesus choose women. 🙂

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  2. Lydia says:

    They also tend to forget the inconvenient fact that the Joel Prophecy was not for ONE day but for the church age.

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  3. spiritualsamurai says:

    You are 100% correct. It was a woman who first proclaimed Jesus had risen from the dead!

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  4. Hopscotch Grace says:

    Interesting the way we don’t hear this preached about often in church. And when/if it is, the role the women played is somehow explained away…

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    • We have ignored the staggering significance of a woman hearing this news before anyone else. There were men about. We know that the guards were there, or had been. Mary thought she saw a gardener, so it is possible other people were there. But Jesus chose these women to tell the whole world that he had arisen!

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  5. Mabel says:

    The traditionalists’ defense: Mary was not “preaching inside a church”! I recently realized that they have this definition of church that defies the Holy Spirit. Women can write, be a missionary, answer questions on the internet, blog, teach through multi-media, etc. That’s all OK because, as they claim: they are not being an “ordained” “pastor” in a “church”. They even argue that Paul is not an “ordained pastor”, he is a church planting missionary. I cannot figure out how they can say all that with a straight face.

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  6. Kristen says:

    “We have ignored the staggering significance of a woman hearing this news before anyone else. There were men about.”

    Not just men– there were two of the 12 male apostles who came to the tomb early, according to the book of John. It says Peter and John both came and saw nothing but the linen cloths. The angel waited until they had “gone to their homes” before appearing to Mary Magdalene, who had brought them there when she found the tomb empty. Then apparently the rest of the women came, according to Luke, and saw first the angels, then Jesus. It certainly looks like the men didn’t just miss out because they didn’t come early– it looks like it was quite deliberate on God’s part that it should be ONLY WOMEN who got the news of the Resurrection first.

    I don’t think the male apostles, in that time when women’s testimony was not considered valid– and they themselves had refused to believe the women– could possibly have missed the implications. The surrounding culture would not listen to women, but Jesus began His new creation kingdom by making it absolutely clear to his male followers that they had to be different– they had to listen to their sisters in faith.

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  7. Lynne says:

    Lol! I have been telling people for the last few years that I refuse to argue over what Paul did and didn’t say about women, because there are so many different possible interpretations — my mandate as a woman to get up and preach comes from Jesus telling Mary to go and tell the male disciples that He has risen from the dead1 (Which was even NEW teaching)

    I do wonder if some of these it-wasn’t-in-a-church dudes would recognise anything in the New Testament era as church as they know it ..

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    • Just another way we have changed the gospel. There was no church building, and these “dudes” are definitely speaking of a brick and mortar church building.

      I don’t want to be a preacher. I have no desire to be a preacher. What I don’t want is the gospel distorted to say that God wouldn’t call me to preach simply because I was born a woman. Jesus certainly doesn’t teach that. Paul doesn’t either, by the way. We have distorted his words and meaning, also.

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  8. Mabel says:

    Lynne said, “I do wonder if some of these it-wasn’t-in-a-church dudes would recognise anything in the New Testament era as church as they know it ..”

    No, they would not recognize it. Women are not to “have authority over men”(as if authority comes from man), to preach behind the “pulpit” inside a building called “church” (the parking lot is OK). If a woman preaches 2 feet away from the church, it is OK. If she stands anywhere but on a stage behind the “pulpit” it is OK, etc. etc. Women had been told to not go up to the stage when they give a testimony in front of the congregation. They must stand flush with the seats, not a few steps up on the stage reserved for men, altho’ women choir members, soloists, etc. can go up to the stage. I don’t understand, for the life of me, that traditionalists who do all this do not realize how idiotic their behavior is! Geeze!!!!

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  9. KR Wordgazer says:

    Good grief, Mabel! I was unaware of this idea that women can’t walk up the steps and stand on stage where the men belong. So they have to stay down below where they belong, huh?

    Can you imagine the outcry if this were a a policy regarding people of color?

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  10. Lydia says:

    I had to laugh reading Mabel’s comment because it reminded me of something. I once had a pastor tell me it was ok for men to listen to Beth Moore teach because she was on video and not in person!

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    • The sad thing is that Beth Moore thinks she can teach men because she is doing it under the authority of her pastor and her husband. I wrote and told her that if husbands and pastors had the ability to supercede God’s law, then we should all be afraid of that kind of power. She didn’t answer.

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    • Hopscotch Grace says:

      Wow! Just…wow. So as long as maybe she (Moore) doesn’t *know* about it, it’s okay? Yes, I know: Quit trying to apply logic. Wow.

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  11. KR Wordgazer says:

    To quote a commercial I heard recently: “It makes sense as long as you don’t think about it.” (grin)

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